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December 15, 2008

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mrebks

Tony Bennett yesterday and now Frankie Laine today? (do i detect a man on a mission?) Swing groups led by Clayton could work magic with anyone. so chacun a son gout, but i vote for Benedetto the Energizer, still ticking, still going, as evidenced by the new Xmas CD with Basie Band and others--fine even if not essential Tony, unlike that great, so-called Live album on Columbia of Bennett and Basie dating from the late Fifties (which means pre-dating the splendid Live at Carnegie Hall of 1962 or so)...

Michael Steinman

How nice to read this -- when I was collecting 78s, a passion I no longer indulge in, I would often notice some of Laine's early Mercury sides because they had trumpet solos (cited on the label) by Buck Clayton or Mannie Klein: Laine obviously had a deep feeling for jazz well before this Columbia session. And, like all of the Columbia jazz sessions of this period, it has a huge lovely sound, courtesy of intelligent engineering and their 30th Street Studios. It's a pity that so many people no longer know who Laine is or, if they do, they associate him with round-'em-up-move-'em-out cowboy songs. His "crying" is often a bit excessive for me, but he had a real pulse. On a moderately relevant note, I once read a piece in the New York Times by Nat Hentoff (I think) who said that he thought Dean Martin should have made a record with a small jazz group -- Joe Thomas on trumpet and Vic Dickenson on trombone were the leaders of the imaginary ensemble. I can hear this in my head, and it would have been a great idea.

Keep it up, Marc: smart music and smart words! Michael

Michael

How nice to read this -- when I was collecting 78s, a passion I no longer indulge in, I would often notice some of Laines early Mercury sides because they had trumpet solos (cited on the label) by Buck Clayton or Mannie Klein: Laine obviously had a deep feeling for jazz well before this Columbia session. And, like all of the Columbia jazz sessions of this period, it has a huge lovely sound, courtesy of intelligent engineering and their 30th Street Studios. Its a pity that so many people no longer know who Laine is or, if they do, they associate him with round-em-up-move-em-out cowboy songs. His crying is often a bit excessive for me, but he had a real pulse. On a moderately relevant note, I once read a piece in the New York Times by Nat Hentoff (I think) who said that he thought Dean Martin should have made a record with a small jazz group -- Joe Thomas on trumpet and Vic Dickenson on trombone were the leaders of the imaginary ensemble. I can hear this in my head, and it would have been a great idea.

Keep it up, Marc: smart music and smart words! Michael

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  • Marc Myers writes frequently on music and the arts for the Wall Street Journal. He is author of "Why Jazz Happened" (University of California Press). JazzWax has been named the Jazz Journalists Association's "Blog of the Year."
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