« Interview: Billy Joel (Part 1) | Main | Hidden Jazz Downloads (Vol. 7) »

February 25, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e008dca1f088340112790ad8ff28a4

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Interview: Billy Joel (Part 2):

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Billy Joel

Dear Mr. Myers, Thanks for the interview. It was nice to talk about music for a change. I don't usually get asked about it much. I guess that's why I pretty much stopped doing interviews. Also, I forgot to mention that we named the album '52nd Street' because we recorded it at the old A&R Studio on the corner of 52nd and 7th -right on the corner of 'Swing Street'. I wanted to give a nod to all the great musicians that used to play in all those jazz clubs there -so I held a trumpet for the cover photo - .just as a gesture of respect - I never could play the damn thing. Regards, Billy Joel

MrD

Many thanks for the Phil Woods interview, plus Billy Joel follow up. It's great that jazz journalism still exists.

Charles Garnett

Very interesting interview. I like the focus of the discussion.

A brief tangent discussion on his songwriting process would have been an added bonus.


I've always wondered where he draws his lyrical styles from. Hes got so many great stories. Bob Dylan? Neil Young? Paul Simon?

J Cohen

Great interview. Billy Joel is remarkably humble about his piano-playing skills, but I think he's actually pretty under-rated as a piano player. In my opinion, he's one of the best piano players in rock music history, period. He might not be able to play jazz like Bill Evans, but who among us can say that they can play jazz like Bill Evans? (Answer: none of us)

You can definitely see the influence of jazz piano in Joel's work. For instance, even though his signature song, "Piano Man" is a folk song, Joel added a jazz-piano intro and a jazz-piano solo to his performance of the piece. So there's no doubt that Joel studied jazz pianists like Bill Evans. And it's really cool to hear him talk about it.

I'd be interested to know how he decided to include those jazz bits in "Piano Man." Did he come up with those piano parts in the studio, improvising? Or did he work them out on paper when he wrote the song?

The comments to this entry are closed.

About

  • Marc Myers writes frequently on music and the arts for the Wall Street Journal. He is author of "Why Jazz Happened" (University of California Press). JazzWax has been named the Jazz Journalists Association's "Blog of the Year."
Marc Myers Mug (resized)

Contact me

Jazz Book!

  • Click cover to order

Search JazzWax


  • JazzWax
    Web

Subscribe for Free

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

JazzWax Interviewed



WSJ Articles

JazzWax Interviews

Audio Note

  • Audio clips that appear below JazzWax posts support editorial content that links readers directly to Amazon and other third-party music retailers.

Marc Myers on Video









JATP Programs