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September 23, 2009

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Red Colm O'Sullivan

There's a solo piano album, "Avenue of The Americas", on French Owl, that I've loved very particularly all of my listening life. It really fascinated me at one stage in my youth - I used listen to it (at least one side!) every night for months on end, and I do mean EVERY night!
Also, his association with Clark Terry - going right back to a quartet record with Dave Bailey and the immortal George Duvivier - is an important one I think.
Now, I too love his current run of albums that feature the marvelous bassist, Martin Wind. Everything I've heard from him lately is of the most assured trancendant class.

Rob Rijneke

Don Friedman played together with the Dutch
guitar player Klaus Flenter on a beautiful album "Togetherness" released in 1989 by the former label Limetree Records (Now Timeless Records) in The Netherlands produced by Ton Molkenboer and undersigned Rob Rijneke (www.billevans.nl)

Carla Oliviera

So glad to see this wonderful interview with the great and truly unheralded Don Friedman. His first trio recording "A Day In The City" for Riverside Records in 1961 was a pioneering effort in that it touched upon both interactive/conversational playing as well as free playing. I've always felt that the trio of Friedman, Chuck Israels and Joe Hunt were creating equally original, compelling and possibly more adventurous music during this period to that of Bill Evans, Scott Lafaro and Paul Motian.
Incidentally, the original "A Day In The City" Trio of Friedman, Israels and Hunt recently reunited and recorded a wonderful new trio recording entitled "Straight Ahead". I highly recommend this CD as it may very well be his finest trio recording since those early 1960's Riverside dates.

David

Another good example of Don's solo playing is on the Maybeck series. He's also the pianist on Booker Little's classic "Out Front."

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