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February 22, 2012

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Brew

Wow! Another undiscovered gem, recorded in the "Kind Of Blue" studio.

Thanks a bunch for the exquisite recommendation, Marc. Now, that's a very nice way to spend some bucks, besides getting my harmon mute repaired ;)

Rab Hines

Another aspect of jazz culture you will only find at Jazzwax - thank you.

I wonder if this vanity project thing led to many other sessions - I have two CDs, one a Hank Jones date and the other by Ray Brown (at least that's how they were issued on CD), but they appear to be play for hire sessions for an interesting character named Darwin Gross, who was leader of the Eckankar faith, and as such was " ...considered a spiritual master who has descended from an ancient and direct line extending into a history that is said to predate the early history and existence of our planet and solar system."

The guy was interesting to say the least, and was able to indulge himself (I think there were three sessions in all, I'm not sure) with sidemen like Hank Jones, Ray Brown, John Lewis, Mickey Roker and the like.

The music is predictable, pleasant stuff - but the idea of being able to hire "sidemen" like that is the stuff of dreams.

Thanks again for a fascinating tour down another byroad of jazz.

Steven C.

A real jazz detective story, and an excellent read. Thank you, Marc!

John P. Cooper

Most interesting!

If Ted bought "100,000 copies", where did they all go?

Was the LP released in stereo? 1959 - stereo years.

And who is the gentleman in the first human photo?

John P. Cooper

Gene Quill (as) [pictured]

Right you are, Steven C.!

Tim

Wow, fascinating. I actually have a copy of this LP but haven't listened to it yet....

Brew

Quote, re: Gene Quill --

Phil (Woods) has a number of good Quill stories. I like the one where Quill is coming off the bandstand and someone snidely says to him:

"Gene Quill, all you're doing is imitating Charlie Parker."

Quill unhooks his alto and extends it towards the smartass and says:

"Here -- you imitate Charlie Parker."

TrptGeek

My high school band had most of these charts thanks to a very well-connected L.A. band leader. They were all beautifully written, sophisticated, and very interesting takes on each song. Being only a junior or senior in h.s., these arrangements constituted the first time I (and I imagine many of my band mates) heard many of these songs, and they remain etched in mind as prime examples of each. I can almost hear them today........

Hans Doerrscheidt

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  • Marc Myers writes on music and the arts for The Wall Street Journal. He is author of "Why Jazz Happened" (Univ. of California Press). Founded in 2007, JazzWax is a Jazz Journalists Association's "Blog of the Year" winner.
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