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April 25, 2012

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B. Sussman

"I Love Brazil" might be quite a lame title for an album, but actually, the record gathers a dream team of musicians, among them phenomenal guitarist Helio Delmiro, Brazilian producer legend Milton Nascimento and even Antonio Carlos Jobim who plays piano on "Someone to Light Up My Life". Together with Sarah's "Copacabana" (1979) and "Brazilian Romance" (1987), the album is part of a trinity of bossa and samba spirit that shines all the way.

dB

The 1970s were/are often cited as a period of decay - a "hangover" from the 1960s. Perhaps. Perhaps the 1970s can only be interpreted within the context of the 1960s.

Can any intelligent person living now (2013 or whenever you read this) even conceive of an America whereby a late-night television talk show would feature such artistry and talent? Certainly one can now seek out such performances on the web. But when did things shift?

In my opinion, the popular "culture" is now "garbarge-i-cized"...

It is a sad country/"culture" that we now live in, where mainstream media does not bother to promulgate artistry and technique. Very sad.

I love Rock/Pop music. But, without the likes of Sarah Vaughan in the popular consciousness, one cannot judge Rap, Rock , etc. in the proper context.

So glad my (hippie) old man had a Sarah Vaughan record, "Live In Japan", which I was able to listen to, over and over...and other "obscure" records.

G-d help this generation of young people...(and I do not necessarily believe in "G-d")

They have been robbed of the culture that should have been bestowed them.

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  • Marc Myers writes frequently on music and the arts for the Wall Street Journal. He is author of "Why Jazz Happened" (University of California Press). In 2012, JazzWax was named the Jazz Journalists Association's "Blog of the Year."
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